Wednesday, 9 August 2017

Juris North Discussion Group [September-December 2017]


The Juris North Group invites you to attend to the discussion on the following papers this term (flyer/poster attached):

Week One [Wednesday 27th September, at 3pm, hosted by Manchester Law School] – “On Global Constitutionalism's Philosophical and Biopolitical Significance: The Case of Implied Legal Principles and Rules.” Dr. Luca Siliquini-Cinelli, Senior Lecturer, Department of Law, Liverpool Hope University.

Week Two [Wednesday 11th October 2017, at 3pm, hosted by Manchester Law School] – “Human Dignity: Constitutive not Regulative.” Dr. Stephen Riley, Lecturer, Department of Law, University of Leicester.

Week Three [Wednesday 1st November 2017, at 3pm, hosted by Durham Law School] – “What has private law ever done for Justice?” Dr. Claudio Michelon, Professor of the Philosophy of Law, Edinburgh Law School, University of Edinburgh.

Week Four [Wednesday 22nd November 2017, at 3pm, hosted by the Manchester Law School] – “Positive Discrimination and Intrinsic Rights Jurisprudence: A Critical Analysis of the Case of Tribes in India.” Dr Prasenjit Biswas, Associate Professor of Philosophy, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong, India.

Week Five [Wednesday 6th December 2017, at 3pm, hosted by the Manchester Law School] – “Crossing Borders: LGBT Families and the Failure of Freedom of Movement.” Dr. Stephen Whittle, Professor, School of Law, Manchester Metropolitan University.

The respective papers will be distributed by email before each event.
Enquiries: Dr Jorge Nunez j.nunez@mmu.ac.uk




Friday, 4 August 2017

Book Presentations April-August 2017: Sovereignty Conflicts and International Law and Politics


Sovereignty Conflicts and International Law and Politics
A Distributive Justice Issue
© 2017 – Routledge


Routledge ORDER
Amazon (Hardcover and Kindle Edition)


Book Presentations so far...


Mexico, UNAM, August 2017


Lisbon, Portugal, IVR, July 2017


Athens, Greece, ATINER, July 2017


La Plata and Buenos Aires, UNLP and UBA, Argentina
June 2017


Lima, Peru, June 2017


Bogota, Colombia, June 2017


St Petersburg, Russia, May 2017


Moscow, Russia, May 2017

Budapest, Hungary, May 2017


Bucharest, Romania, April 2017

Many thanks to all the audiences around the world for such an amazing experience. Many persons from the non-scientific community participated too, that is society at large. My deepest gratitude goes to them. Thanks to the comments received through emails, Twitter, my blog, face-to-face, formally or informally in Argentina, the United Kingdom, the Malvinas/Falkland Islands, Spain, México, Perú, China, Turkey, Russia, the United States of America, Brazil, Nigeria, Gibraltar, Kashmir, Israel. These pages would have been meaningless without their input. For science and philosophy with any relevance to a positive impact on people and their life are, for this writer, what make these pages meaningful.

Dr Jorge E. Núñez
Manchester, 04th August 2017.

Saturday, 29 July 2017

Book Presentation. Lisbon Portugal. July 2017 [video]


Sovereignty Conflicts and International Law and Politics
A Distributive Justice Issue
© 2017 – Routledge



Many conflicts throughout the world can be characterised as sovereignty conflicts in which two States claim exclusive sovereign rights for different reasons over the same piece of land. It is increasingly clear that the available remedies have been less than successful in many of these cases, and that a peaceful and definitive solution is needed. This book proposes a fair and just way of dealing with certain sovereignty conflicts. Drawing on the work of John Rawls this book considers how distributive justice theories can be in tune with the concept of sovereignty and explores the possibility of a solution for sovereignty conflicts based on Rawlsian methodology. Jorge E. Núñez explores a solution of egalitarian shared sovereignty, evaluating what sorts of institutions and arrangements could, and would, best realise shared sovereignty, and how it might be applied to territory, population, government and law.

 
Jorge E. Núñez is Senior Lecturer at Manchester Law School, UK and Visiting Professor at Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, UNLP, Argentina


Monday, 24 July 2017

25th World Congress of Political Sciences [CALL FOR PROPOSALS]




25th World Congress of Political Sciences
IPSA - AISP
Brisbane, Australia 21-26 July 2018

Panel

Sovereignty and borders

Organizers

Amarilla rta Kiss

Jorge Emilio Núñez


Presentation
Sovereignty and borders are key concepts questioned in several disciplines. On the one hand, there are traditional territorial disputes, from the rise of Islamic State, the Ukrainian Crisis and Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and the failure/potential dismemberment of states in the Caucasus and the Middle East to maritime disputes like the South China Sea. These events indicate that the recognition of sovereignty as a bounded legal norm is not static. On the other hand, in particular since 911, new forms of terrorism and transnational crimes−e.g. cyber-terrorism−have appeared resulting in a challenge to the concept of borders.

International relations and legal and political scholarly literature offer a plethora of views on sovereignty and borders, both nationally and internationally. Many scholars of legal and political theory and international relations use the terms “sovereignty” and “borders” and similar terminology to refer to various different realities. However, such conceptions fall short in offering common grounds for debate. Sovereignty and borders are unquestionably complex, both conceptually and in substance. There are at least two realms intertwined in all of these views: politics and law.

Simply put, the panel intends to explore a major gap in international relations, law, and political sciences: it will be a multi-disciplinary platform for debate to the different views of sovereignty and borders offered by different sciences (law, political sciences, international relations).

Aims
The rationale for the workshop is simple, yet potentially of very high impact.
1.              Conceptual debate in law and political sciences:
a)     To review and challenge the current understanding of the concept of “sovereignty” in international relations, jurisprudence, and political theory.
b)     To offer a conceptual common ground for future discussions on sovereignty.
2.              Substantive debate in law and political sciences:
a)    To review concrete territorial debates in which sovereignty issues have a central role.
b)    To share, compare and contrast empirical research that relates to territory and sovereignty.

Notes: Open to additional interested participants. The abstracts and brief academic biography
should be submitted by no later than Friday 22nd September 2017.
Language/word limit: The abstracts must be written in English and should be under 350 words.
The sessions will be held in English.


Organizers
Amarilla Márta Kiss (Co-Chair)
Lecturer in Public International and European Law. (Pazmany Peter Catholic University, Budapest, Hungary).  Areas of research: international courts and tribunals, maritime piracy, unique socio-legal nature of public international law.

Jorge Emilío Núñez (Co-Chair)
PhD in Law (Manchester-UK). Senior Lecturer in Law (Manchester-UK).
Profesor de Derecho (UNLP-Argentina). Areas of research: jurisprudence, legal theory, political
theory, international relations. Various international publications and events worldwide as key
speaker.


Sunday, 16 July 2017

Book Presentation. Athens Greece. July 2017 [video]



Sovereignty Conflicts and International Law and Politics
A Distributive Justice Issue
© 2017 – Routledge
 
 
 
Many conflicts throughout the world can be characterised as sovereignty conflicts in which two States claim exclusive sovereign rights for different reasons over the same piece of land. It is increasingly clear that the available remedies have been less than successful in many of these cases, and that a peaceful and definitive solution is needed. This book proposes a fair and just way of dealing with certain sovereignty conflicts. Drawing on the work of John Rawls this book considers how distributive justice theories can be in tune with the concept of sovereignty and explores the possibility of a solution for sovereignty conflicts based on Rawlsian methodology. Jorge E. Núñez explores a solution of egalitarian shared sovereignty, evaluating what sorts of institutions and arrangements could, and would, best realise shared sovereignty, and how it might be applied to territory, population, government and law.

 
Jorge E. Núñez is Senior Lecturer at Manchester Law School, UK and Visiting Professor at Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, UNLP, Argentina
 
 
 
 
 

Friday, 30 June 2017

Book Presentation. Manchester (en castellano). Junio 2017 [video]


Sovereignty Conflicts and International Law and Politics
A Distributive Justice Issue
© 2017 – Routledge

Abstract.
La mayoría-si no todos-los conflictos en  relaciones internacionales tienen algo que ver con soberanía. En el aspecto teórico, nos enseñan en la Universidad que tanto considerado como un concepto fundamental cuanto uno que ha perdido relevancia, todavía se discute. En el aspecto real, las prerrogativas que un Estado tiene sobre la población y el territorio parece ser el más alto. En este contexto a la vez ideal y real, existen varias disputas de soberanía en todo el mundo que  transitan entre el limbo jurídico y político, status quo y la tensión continua con diversas consecuencias negativas para todas las partes involucradas (e.g. violación de derechos humanos, guerra, tráfico de armas, sólo por nombrar algunos). Cada vez es más evidente que los remedios disponibles son inútiles, y una solución pacífica y definitiva se necesita. Este libro presenta y evalúa una forma equitativa y justa de abordar ciertos conflictos de soberanía.

 
La Primera Parte presenta el argumento central sobre el que se desarrolla la tesis. Tradicionalmente se entiende que la soberanía no se comparte y es ilimitada. Sostengo que, en realidad, tanto en la teoría como en la práctica la soberanía es siempre limitada. De suyo, considero cómo la soberanía compartida es posible, cómo un Estado puede limitarse y seguir siendo soberano. El Capítulo Uno, la introducción, presenta los elementos básicos constitutivos de este trabajo. El Capítulo Dos examina si la soberanía puede ser (de hecho, es) limitada, por lo que se puede compartir. Para demostrar  utilizo tanto la crítica de las teorías más conocidas de soberanía como la investigación de hechos históricos.

 
La Segunda Parte explora los elementos mínimos que deben ser reconocidos conceptual, legal y realmente, con el fin de dar cuerpo a la soberanía compartida y la forma en que tienen que trabajar si queremos tener un entendimiento pacífico entre las partes interesadas. El Capítulo Tres evalúa “soberanía compartida” y expresiones similares utilizadas en la literatura política y jurídica. Con el fin de hacer eso, se muestra qué nociones de soberanía compartida no son relevantes. El Capítulo Cuatro examina cómo una noción relevante puede ser desarrollada, utilizando la analogía de la propiedad sobre uno mismo. El Capítulo Cinco analiza los principales remedios aplicados a nivel internacional en temas de soberanía y por qué las alternativas propuestas a la soberanía compartida no resuelven el problema.

 
La Tercera Parte examina cómo las teorías de justicia distributiva pueden estar en sintonía con el concepto de soberanía y explora la posibilidad de una solución ideal para los conflictos de soberanía. Sostengo que no sólo la soberanía compartida puede ser justa sino también que para ser justa, debe basarse en la metodología de Rawls. El Capítulo Seis presenta y analiza por qué la soberanía compartida es justa. El Capítulo Siete evalúa cómo funciona el modelo en la práctica al mostrar a grandes rasgos cómo se podría aplicar al territorio, población, gobierno y leyes.
Jorge E. Núñez is Senior Lecturer at Manchester Law School, UK and Visiting Professor at Facultad de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, UNLP, Argentina